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IUCD Insertion

Overview:

  • An IUCD or Intra-uterine Contraceptive Device or coil is a T-shaped implant impregnated with copper or hormones that is placed in the uterus (womb) to prevent pregnancy. This is a safe and effective non-permanent method of female contraception.

 

Pre Procedure:

  • Tests may be done to check for pregnancy or infection.

  • IUCD procedure can be done on  4th / 5th / 6th day of menstrual cycle.

 

During the Procedure:

  • The procedure will take approximately 15 to 20 minutes.

  • You may be asked to change into a hospital gown.

  • You will be required to lie down comfortably on a procedure table with your knees bent, in an area where your privacy is respected throughout the procedure.

  • Doctor will gently insert an instrument called a speculum into the vagina.

  • The speculum holds the walls of the vagina apart so that your doctor can easily see the cervix. Inserting the speculum may cause a sensation of pressure in the pelvic area.

  • The cervix is held with an instrument. This causes a pin prick like pain which is easily tolerable.

  • The IUCD will then be put in the uterus. You may feel cramping or mild discomfort while the IUCD is being placed. 

  • Please note, IUCDs do not protect against sexually transmitted diseases.

 

Post Procedure:

  • Medicine may be given if required, to ease discomfort.

  • You may experience slight vaginal bleeding and mild cramping that should last only for a a day or two as your body gets used to the IUCD. 

  • You may resume normal activities immediately after the procedure.

  • Spotting between the menstrual cycles could occur, which is normal. 

  • You must review with your gynaecologist after your next menstrual cycle.

  • Please contact your doctor / gynaecologist immediately, if recovery is not going as expected or if any of the following happen:

  • Change in the length of the strings or you cannot feel the strings with your fingers.

  • Heavy periods or periods that last longer than usual.

  • Missed, late or unusually light periods.

  • You or your partner have or are exposed to a sexually transmitted disease.

  • Severe cramps, pain or tenderness in your belly.

  • Pain or bleeding during intercourse.

  • Unexplained fever or chills.

  • Flu-like symptoms like muscle aches or tiredness.

  • Unusual discharge from the vagina or sores on the vaginal area.

  • Unexplained vaginal bleeding.

  • Severe headaches.

  • Rapid heartbeats.

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